CREATING ACCESSIBLE AUDIO CONTENT
Illustration of a binder clip

Summary

close-up of lit On-Air sign

Image: On Air sign.

Here is a reminder of the learning outcomes for this module:

  • Assess how to make audio content accessible for persons who have hearing loss, people who are hard of hearing, and who are culturally Deaf, oral deaf, and/or deafened in order to acknowledge systemic barriers in broadcast media
  • Practice transcribing audio content manually in order to make radio shows, podcasts, and other audio material more inclusive
  • Introduce American Sign Language (ASL) and Quebec Sign Language, la langue des signes quebecoise (LSQ) in order to establish sign language as an important and viable way of making audio content accessible
  • Evaluate recent initiatives to make broadcast radio content accessible within Canada and in the United States in order to make audio content accessible and inclusive

Providing transcripts for audio content such as radio shows and podcasts along with using ASL interpretation can help to make the information more accessible for persons who have hearing loss, persons who are hard of hearing, and who are culturally Deaf, oral deaf, and/or deafened. Some exciting initiatives are happening in order to make audio content more accessible in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom.

In Canada, CBC Radio show The Current provides a daily transcript of each show as well as a monthly ASL interpreted radio documentary, posted on The Current website.open new window

And, in the United Kingdom, Canadian broadcast journalist and CEO of Trint, Jeff Kofman, working with the Trint team, has developed a new transcription software that makes transcribing audio faster and easier.

When audio is transcribed or accompanied by an ASL video, the content is accessible for persons who have hearing loss, persons who are hard of hearing, and who are deaf, culturally Deaf, oral deaf, and/or deafened.